Feeling the Love after the Hate

Published Jun. 19, 2016 in the Ames Tribune.

I learned about the Orlando mass murder on Sunday morning before worship. I was dilly-dallying at home because we were gathering at a congregant’s llama farm rather than our sanctuary at Sixth and Kellogg. My wife read me headlines, but I didn’t look at any of the coverage myself. During worship we prayed for the victims and the perpetrator both, as our tradition teaches us to do, but in retrospect I was functioning only at an intellectual level. I had the information but had not heard the truth.

On arriving home I turned on the news to hear President Obama’s address. When he said “This is an especially heartbreaking day for all our friends—our fellow Americans—who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender,” I started to cry.

My survival strategy as a Lesbian in America has been to simply reject any and all statements or efforts that diminish me as a person, as a full citizen in this nation. I am a product of my biology and I do not suffer ignorance of that reality.

But that hasn’t meant I’ve walked through the world unbruised. It bruised me to have to go to Canada to get married. It bruised me to learn that, because she retired before the Supreme Court upheld gay marriage, I will be denied survivor benefits from my wife’s pension. It bruised me to have to leave the church of my childhood because I was considered invalid. It bruised me to know that 75% of congregations in my new church considered me invalid, too.
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God is using YOU: 2 Corinthians 5.11–21

godsparkDelivered at Ames UCC
on June 19, 2016
©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be heard rather than read.
Please join us for worship
at 10:30 a.m. on Sundays
(except in July, when we worship with
First Christian Church at 9:30 a.m.).

RECONCILIATION
At the heart of today’s passage from Paul’s second letter to his church at Corinth is the notion of reconciliation. The version we hear today, from
The Message translation, gives a clear definition:

God uses us to persuade men and women to drop their differences and enter into God’s work of making things right between them.

Reconciliation is the holy work of bridging divides, breaking down walls—whatever metaphor means the most to you to describe eliminating the divisions between people and holiness.

For Paul, the impetus to do this is Jesus Christ. He understands the execution and Easter mystery as God using Jesus as a scapegoat, in the most traditional sense of the word: Put all sins on Jesus then drive him out of existence.

And, for Paul, reconciliation is essential because Jesus will be back very, very soon. He’s less than 20 years out from Easter and certain to his bones that they need to be in the business of preparing for a massive, world-wide, collective, and final experience of God.

In the two millennia since Paul was building churches and creating this first Christian theology, as we have built churches and lived with that theology, we have developed other, equally valid, understandings.

You may remember that, last summer, I did a survey of our church and found we range from classic Pauline theology to “Jesus was a good, regular man to whom a bad thing was done and from whom we can learn to do better.” And we are not a church that places such an emphasis on a second coming of Christ. We name the constant risings of Christ in our midst rather than the cataclysm that Paul imagined.

I think there are at least two reasons for that. First, all predictions of the second coming have proved false. God’s time is clearly not our time. Second, we have plenty of cataclysms of our own that need to be reconciled. We don’t need to worry about one from on high.
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Queer Rally

20160615_193736On Wednesday, June 15, 2016, a group of community organizations—Story County Democrats, Moms Demand Action/Everytown for Gun Safety, Ames Progressive Alliance, Iowa State University College Democrats, and Liberty Gifts—held a rally in response to the Orlando massacre. I had the honor to speak directly to my fellow queer Americans and those who stand with us.

I am Eileen Gebbie. I am a Christian priest and an out and proud, refusing to be bowed, Lesbian.

Tonight is intended to be a call to action and here is one that we can all take: come out. If you are genderqueer, trans, intersex, bisexual, lesbian, or gay, come out about who you love and who you are.

I know how dangerous that might feel tonight. Because of Mathew Shepard, and Lamia Beard, and Orlando, I know how dangerous that is.

If coming out would jeopardize your employment or if coming out would put you at risk of homelessness or violence because of who you live with now, take care. Now may not be the time to come out too loudly.

But do come out to your heart. Do tell your soul your own truth. And come out to someone trustworthy and confidential who can live out for you until your time comes. Come out to me.

This is also a time for our straight and cisgendered siblings, cousins, parents, and friends to come out. Come out about loving us, with no exceptions. Speak up when you hear disparaging remarks, always, but also start conversations with others about your adamant refusal to hate.

And let us know that you do. Do not take for granted our confidence in your love. It has been powerfully shaken these days.

But our integrity of self has made us resilient. And we take heart in the faces we see this night.

These deaths and injuries are not the final word. It is for them as much as ourselves that we WILL find the strength to continue to come out, to live well beyond the closet’s shadow and in the full light—and disco nights—of our lives. Thank you.

©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Gathering in Response to Orlando

On Monday, June 13, 2016, I hosted a gathering at my church in response to the mass shooting in a gay bar in Orlando, FL. The order of service and my comments folllow.

GREETING
13391604_1189965757703748_893419545035532880_oIn 2012 I gathered with my church to mourn the slaughter of children at Sandy Hook Elementary. Last August, I gathered with my church to lament the slaughter of the Mother Emanuel Nine and Freddie Gray and Tamir Rice and so many other African Americans.

Today, we gather again as a church and as a city and a county in rage and shock at the slaughter of 49 predominantly Latina and Latino members of the queer community.

The Young, black, brown, and queer: all targets of profound violence and cruel death.

In my religious tradition, we talk about how God cares most for “the least of these,” and how we are to literally care for the widow, the orphan, and the stranger. But our nation, or at least some of our neighbors, seek out the least for death, not protection.

In 2012, I greeted my congregation with the following:

Welcome to this space of prayer. May you find it a place of comfort this night, and safety. May you find hope in the space between us. May we grown more whole as our time together unfolds.

How tepid that now sounds. How insufficient for the gore that has followed. And yet true. This is a space of prayer, this is a place for comfort and hope. But we dare not skip to those without confronting our grief and anger, or we will never find wholeness in ourselves or among each other.

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Forgiveness Begins in Holy Community: 2 Corinthians 2.1–10

forgivenessDelivered at Ames UCC
on May 29, 2016
©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be
heard rather than read.

Please join us for worship
at 10:30 a.m. on Sundays.

FORGIVENESS STORIES
When Adam and Eve were in God’s garden, they broke God’s one rule. God could not forgive them and so they were banished. Later, Adam’s and Eve’s sons presented offerings to God. God preferred that of Abel over that of Cain. Cain could not forgive the slight, but rather than rejecting God, he killed Abel.

After studying the Bible with pastors and congregants of Mother Emanuel AME in Charleston, SC, a young man murdered nine of them in an effort to start a race war. On his first appearance in court, the daughter of 70-year-old Ethel Lance said

I forgive you…You took something very precious from me. I will never talk to her again. I will never, ever hold her again. But I forgive you. And have mercy on your soul.

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