Apocalypse Already: Acts 2.1–21

2017.6.4 pentecostDelivered at Ames UCC
on June 4, 2017

©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be
heard rather than read.
Please join us for worship
at 10:30 a.m. on Sundays
(except in July–
see the church website for details).

THANKS, BUT NO THANKS
Sometimes this passage feels like a bait and switch. It lures us in with this marvelous moment of human unity and a prediction of even more, only to tell us it won’t really happen until after an apocalyptic encounter between the realms of Earth and those of heaven. I want a direct experience of God, for sure. But who would want the great and glorious day of the Lord if it must be preceded by blood, fire, smoky mist, a blacked sun, and a red moon?

Why does Peter interpret this joyous symphony of speech as a sign of some frightening end of time? Why does God’s presence require apocalypse?

The Bible is quite self-referential. Books of the Bible quote each other constantly, either to retell stories in slightly different ways or to prove a point. The Gospels in the Christian Testament, for example, draw heavily on the prophets of the Hebrew Bible to credential Jesus. So when we hear Peter respond to this theophany, it is not his original speech. He is quoting the prophet Joel.

JOEL AND PETER
Joel’s prophecy is in a book of his name, in a section of the Hebrew Bible known as the Nevi’im, or the Prophets. Like Lamentations, which I referenced last week, Joel’s book is about destruction and loss. But unlike Lamentations, Joel makes a case for God’s coming redemption from suffering in the form of equality among all people. However, that can only happen, Joel says, after an apocalypse.
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Why the Cross? Mark 10.17–31

whythecrossDelivered at Ames UCC on
February 14, 2016
©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be
heard rather than read.
(Listen to this one
here.)
Please join us for worship at
10:45 a.m. on Sundays.

LENT
On Wednesday night we gathered with our friends from First Christian Church and First United Methodist Church to mark Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent. We prayed together:

God, this is a hard time. The focus of Lent is on the journey to pain and suffering of Jesus and our own role in continuing to cause such pain. It feels like a time of gathering darkness. We would rather skip this part and go straight to the radiance of Easter. We would rather ignore suffering and avoid the hard work of true self-examination. Forgive us for wanting this to be bright and painless and easy, when we know that Jesus did not take the easy way, but risked the cross for the sake of justice.

After he was baptized by John and God, Jesus was filled by the Holy Spirit and led by it into the wilderness for 40 days. During Lent’s 40 days (plus Sundays) we emulate that trust in God and that fast and struggle. And as the prayer shows, we name the ways we dodge the hard parts of faith, including the cross and what it brings.
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Shootings and the Table: Deuteronomy 5.1–21, 6.4–9

shootings and the tableDelivered at Ames UCC on October 11, 2015
©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be heard rather than read.
Please join us for worship at 10:45 a.m. on Sundays.

TORAH
Today we end our quick trek through the Torah. The Torah consists of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible. In Greek it is known as the Pentateuch.

In Genesis, God recognized the human need for relationship. We then sat with Abraham’s and Sarah’s longing for children. That longing was fulfilled and two generations later, their grandson Jacob made bargains with God and was given the new name of Israel, God Rules.

In Exodus, though, we found that Pharaoh was ruling. The ancient Hebrews had become enslaved and God promised them a new land. Moses saw and heard this promise through a burning bush and recognized that he was standing on holy ground. Our youth shared their own experiences of holy ground and God’s presence in their lives last week.
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