Apocalypse Already: Acts 2.1–21

2017.6.4 pentecostDelivered at Ames UCC
on June 4, 2017

©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

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heard rather than read.
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THANKS, BUT NO THANKS
Sometimes this passage feels like a bait and switch. It lures us in with this marvelous moment of human unity and a prediction of even more, only to tell us it won’t really happen until after an apocalyptic encounter between the realms of Earth and those of heaven. I want a direct experience of God, for sure. But who would want the great and glorious day of the Lord if it must be preceded by blood, fire, smoky mist, a blacked sun, and a red moon?

Why does Peter interpret this joyous symphony of speech as a sign of some frightening end of time? Why does God’s presence require apocalypse?

The Bible is quite self-referential. Books of the Bible quote each other constantly, either to retell stories in slightly different ways or to prove a point. The Gospels in the Christian Testament, for example, draw heavily on the prophets of the Hebrew Bible to credential Jesus. So when we hear Peter respond to this theophany, it is not his original speech. He is quoting the prophet Joel.

JOEL AND PETER
Joel’s prophecy is in a book of his name, in a section of the Hebrew Bible known as the Nevi’im, or the Prophets. Like Lamentations, which I referenced last week, Joel’s book is about destruction and loss. But unlike Lamentations, Joel makes a case for God’s coming redemption from suffering in the form of equality among all people. However, that can only happen, Joel says, after an apocalypse.
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Bearers of Easter Hope: Mark 13.1–8, 24–37

GoodFridaycrossDelivered at Ames UCC
on March 13, 2016
©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be
heard rather than read.

Please join us for worship
at 10:45 a.m. on Sundays.

THE END IS NEAR
This temple will crumble. False prophets will betray you. War is inevitable. The Earth will shake and people will starve. These are the signs predicted by Isaiah (13.10, 34.4), Ezekiel (32.7–8),
and Joel (2.10, 31; 3.15).

You will see them very soon. So stay awake! Do not disappoint your God! Be ready!

As Jesus prepares to end his life, he predicts the end of everyone else’s, too.

Why? Because he was the anointed one and knew something others did not? Possibly. But also because Jesus, at least in Mark, was an apocalyptic leader by nature.

And because it had happened before.

APOCALYPSE
Apocalypse comes from the Greek apokalyptein, which means to uncover or reveal. Within an apocalyptic mindset, there is truth to be uncovered or revealed through a being not of this world.  Apocalypse assumes that there can no redemption for humanity without a radical intervention. And, in fact, that intervention is coming. The outcome will be judgment and destruction of the wicked, followed by resurrection, and afterlife.
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