Our Systems Are Not Working: Job 3.1–10, 4.1–9, 7.11–21

banquetDelivered at First Christian Church
on July 10, 2016
©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be heard rather than read. On Sundays during July we worship with First Christian Church at 9:30 a.m., alternating between FCC and Ames UCC.
Please come join us!

REMEMBER, WE LIVE IN THE ASHES
I mentioned last week that I was worried about preaching on Job off and on all summer, that I thought I needed to find a way to sell this sorry story so that it didn’t become a summer off. I wish the news of the last week hadn’t reminded me that we are already living the sorry story. I wish our world did not require us to learn the language of Job’s ash heap over and over again.

RECAP AND UPDATE
To review: Job was a very rich man and a religious man. An adversarial force came into God’s presence. God bragged to it about Job’s faith. The adversarial force suggested that faith was built on God’s protection and special treatment of Job, that Job’s faith had no integrity. Of course it is easy to be faithful when you get everything you want!

God told the Adversary to take away all of his riches and see—Job would never forsake God. So Job loses his whole family to invaders and natural disasters. And God is right: Job does not forsake God. Then the Adversary, with God’s permission, destroys Job’s skin. Job literally throws himself away, scraping at his sores while sitting in and on the garbage dump.

Job is alone until he is approached by three friends, who sit silently with Job for seven days and seven nights, “for they saw that (his) pain was very great” (2.13).
Continue reading

Christ is Defined by Change: Hebrews 1.1–4

sf_ntBooks_Hebrews01Delivered at Ames UCC on August 9, 2015
© The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be heard rather than read.
Please join us at 10:45 a.m. on Sunday.

BUILD
Last week I went to a training hosted by AMOS with Linda Hanson and Michael Johnson. AMOS, which stands for A Mid-Iowa Organizing Strategy, is an alliance of churches and social service agencies that work together to create social change. For example, AMOS was instrumental in helping to make more affordable housing available in Ames through our city’s recent negotiations with the Breckenridge developers.

I have a lot to share from the training, but today I want to focus on one comment made by one of the organizers, Bishop Douglas Miles of Koinonia Baptist Church in Baltimore, MD. Bishop Miles has been in ministry for over 40 years. He’s been active with BUILD, AMOS’ sister alliance in Baltimore, for almost as long.
Continue reading