First, Rest in God: John 2.13–25


2018.2.21 new
Delivered at Ames UCC
on January 21, 2018

©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be heard, rather than read.
Please join us for worship on
Sunday mornings at 10:30 a.m.

LOVE
Part of me really loves this story.

It’s the part of me that grew up watching Jesus Christ Superstar and its temple scene with women, guns, and sunglasses up for sale. It’s the part of me that loves the liberation inherent in our tradition’s theology: freed slaves, women prophets, direct confrontation with those who are complicit in or mimic the power structures of occupation.

It’s this kind of story that allows me to continue to seek God through Jesus Christ. I could not walk a path that does not eliminate false, human-made barriers to God; I need a path that strips me of my blinders to corruption and self-centered comfort.

FIGHTING
This story sounds different today, though. I’m not sure I can even hear this story today over all of the rest of the fighting in our world.

I thought about putting together a list of the kinds of back-and-forth juvenilia and nastiness from our elected officials on Twitter or some of the commentary over the recent controversy regarding vulgarity in the White House, our house. But I couldn’t bring myself to read them and saw no value in inflicting them on you afresh. You already know.
Continue reading

Make America…

Published March 25, 2017 in the Ames Tribune

by Eileen Gebbie

I used to teach introductory sociology. Sociology is the study of humans in society, in groups. Sociologists, through observation and experiment, develop theories for why we act the way we do. At the time of my schooling, the emphasis within my department’s teaching program was on three major types of theory: social control, structural functionalism, and symbolic interactionism. Each seeks to address how and why societies have the institutions that they do: family, marriage, schools, health care, media, courts, police, unions, and the like.

In social control theories, institutions serve to control the majority of the population for the benefit of a minority. When I taught this to undergrads, I liked to draw a pyramid on the chalkboard (it was olden times), mark off a small triangle at the top, then label it “The Man v. The Rest of Us.” For example, denying people of color and LGBTQIA people full civil rights controls their ability to influence representation and policy as well as maintain the integrity of their families. In those cases, straight, white people, to their own benefit as they see it, control the life chances of others.

Structural functional theories consider the overt and covert functions of institutions. Elementary schools have the overt function of educating kids. The covert functions are/can be training in society’s norm and mores, health care, and nutritional support.

It took me a little time to come up with a good example for the final category, one that would resonate with students at a Midwestern university with a large Greek system and majority white student body. Symbolic interactionist theories suggest that our societies are a product not of large scale forces but every day interactions. So, I would ask them, let’s say the stereotype of white women in sororities is that they are dumb. The room would chuckle. Now, I would continue, imagine I believed that stereotype. Might that change, even without my realizing it, how I interact with white women wearing Greek letters in my classroom? And might my different treatment affect their academic performance? The room always went silent at that point. It became a lot easier to talk about racism after that lecture.

As I watch the unravelling of our national laws and policies put into place to feed the hungry, tend to the sick, protect soil and water, and promote peace rather than war, I ask myself the following questions: Who benefits the most from these changes? What are the functions that are named and those that will occur without being named? And what happened to the supporters in their individual lives to make them think this is the best way to be, as a nation?
Continue reading

Local Priest Urges Community to Practice Hope rather than Hate

First published in the Ames Tribune’s April 2017 FACETS: The Magazine for Women

by Eileen Gebbie

My mother texted a few weeks ago to ask if I wanted the family Christmas tree skirt. If you are unfamiliar with the term, it’s a decorative collar for the base of a Christmas tree.

When Mom retired to southern Australia several years ago, she substantially downsized her belongings, asking the three of us kids to select now what we might otherwise have taken when she dies. My sister asked for some jewelry, my brother some serving ware, and I took the rocker Mom used to sit in when we were infants (with little chew marks on the legs from our old dog). But Christmas decorations were never an option.

So why now? Because when you celebrate Christmas in southern Australia, you are doing so in the summer and it turns out that northern, winter-themed items (including trees) feel a little out of place.

Christianity became a global religion long ago, with its universal truths of love for each other and care for those in need, combined with its spread (often through violence) by the Roman Empire, and then by the empires of England and the United States. And even though the stories, poems, and songs preserved in the Bible are quite arid due to their Middle Eastern and North African origins, there are no particular seasons or nations tied to their truths.

Continue reading