Servants of Love Incarnate: John 2.1–11


2018.1.14 non being
Delivered at Ames UCC
on January 14, 2018

©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be heard, rather than read. Please join us for worship on Sunday mornings
at 10:30 a.m.

JOHN IS DIFFERENT
If John’s gospel were the only one we knew, if we studied it and dedicated our lives to it, then read Matthew, Mark, and Luke, we would be shocked. It’s all lies, we would think! That’s not the truth about Jesus! Likewise, if we had only ever studied the synoptic gospels, synoptic meaning same, we would be baffled by John. It is that different.

John’s gospel does have Jesus traveling and teaching, he does endure trial, death, and resurrection. But John’s chronology is different than in the other three. There is no Eucharist, no Last Supper, in John. Jesus shows no concern for the Kingdom of God in John, only for his own special identity. Jesus talks more in John’s gospel than in the synoptic gospels, with great long dialogues, but never in all of that does he share any parables, those stories of mustard seeds and buried treasure.

And John is the most anti-Semitic of all the gospels. Maybe not universally so, maybe not condemning of all of Judaism, only of specific strains or communities of Judaism at the time. But I am guessing that not many 21st century Christians are all that familiar with the differences between contemporary streams in Judaism, let alone those of the ancient near east, so reading the subtleties of critique in John can be dangerously misleading.

I decided, as a result of that, and this era’s resurgence of overt hatred of and aggression toward people who are Jewish, to modify our readings of John to avoid easy misunderstandings and make clear where we are as a church. Rather than “the Jews” it will read as “the authorities” or whatever the appropriate target of Jesus’ concern may be.

But the difference I really want to focus on today is an omission in John at the beginning of Jesus’ ministry and the inclusion of the story today.
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We Have Already Won: 2 Samuel 7.1–17

already-wonDelivered at Ames UCC
on October 23, 2016
©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be
heard rather than read.

Please join us for worship
at 10:30 a.m. on Sundays.

NATHAN
Last week was Hannah, this week is Nathan. Pr. Hannah’s family has Biblical proportions!

Nathan isn’t a prophet that we talk about a lot, not as we do Amos or Isaiah. But he’s an important character in the story of David.

Remember that prophets are those people who have a singular focus on God with no regard for social niceties. However, not all prophets are created equal. Nathan is a prophet in the king’s court. He is employed by the king. We might question whether he is able to sustain a singular focus in such an arrangement.

When we first meet Nathan today, King David has just wondered aloud how it is that he himself lives in opulence, but the artifacts of God are still in a tent, as they have been since the Exodus. David decides to build a temple. Nathan encourages David to do so—Go for it! Build a temple! God is with you! That same night, though, through Nathan himself, God says not to build a temple.

Later, when David has become an adulterous villain, it is Nathan who calls David out on his abuses. Nathan keeps David in check when he threatens to reverse himself on promises of royal succession. Nathan also assures David of God’s forgiveness after a genuine period of repentance.

So, the speech of prophets is not always prophetic. But Nathan did do the work of one who upholds the heart of the Ten Commandments: reminding others to honor relationships.

LOST IN TRANSLATION
But the focus of today’s portion isn’t Nathan and his prophetic qualities. It’s this issue of whether or not, and when, David should build a temple for God.
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The Crop Will Thrive: Isaiah 5.1–7, 11.1–5

Copy of the wildDelivered on Sunday, November 22, 2015 at Ames UCC.
© The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be heard rather than read.
Please join us any Sunday at 10:45 a.m. for worship.

ORDINARY TIME
Today we are celebrating the end of Ordinary Time with this extraordinary feast. For those of you who didn’t come from a tradition that made use of church seasons, Ordinary Time covers the days after Pentecost in the spring and before Advent in the fall.

It has multiple purposes: Scripturally we look more deeply at the church in light of the Easter mystery. What does it mean to be followers of Jesus Christ on this side of the tomb? And then, as we have done since September, we reacquaint ourselves with the Hebrew Bible, the scripture and religion that Jesus was born into and grew up with. That includes the prophets of the last two weeks and today: Elijah who brought proof of God, Hosea who gave voice to God, and today Isaiah who describes the human condition from God’s perspective.
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A New Revelation: 1 Kings 18.20–39

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Delivered at Ames UCC on November 8, 2015
© The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be heard rather than read.
Please join us on Sundays at 10:45 a.m.

NEXT THREE WEEKS
These last three weeks of Ordinary Time, the season between Pentecost and Advent, are interesting. We have a series of combative texts, stories of the people resisting God and God’s efforts to get us to finally, and permanently, wake up to faith. We will hear from three prophets: Elijah, Hosea, and Isaiah.

A word about prophets: They are trouble. As my rabbi, Dr. Rachel Mikva, likes to say, “You wouldn’t want to be caught in an elevator with a prophet.” Prophets are driven by their experience of God, with no regard for social niceties or our feelings. They are not fortune-tellers but describe possible future events, warnings of what might come if we fail to listen.

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