Resilience in the Ordinary Times of Hate

©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Recently, within an hour of each other, I received two text messages:

Roof repair + scotus + immigration madness = I just want to cry

The tent camp situation is making me physically ill. 108 degrees in Arizona. What in the name of God can we do? What do we do??

Then I was sent a link to this tweet by comedian Solomon Georgio:

We are living through a time of enormous every day and existential threats. For some of us, this is new. For others, it has been their reality for generations.

I offer this list of practices for maintaining emotional, physical, and spiritual resilience, particularly for those of us who, due to our race or education or employment or religion or nation of origin or sexuality or gender, have been shielded from having to do so before.

Pr. Eileen Gebbie

Pray

I do not suggest prayer as a technique to lure God into solving our problems. I suggest prayer because it grounds us in the source of all being, in the generative power of creation. Because it allows our souls to soar above the debris and damage to gain the vantage point of justice and grace.

Walk, Eat, and Sleep

Nothing is more important than your own good health. It’s the putting on of your oxygen mask so that you can live to help others do the same.
Continue reading

What Are We Doing Here? Acts 2.1–4 and 1 Corinthians 12.1–13

Delivered at Ames UCC on May 15, 2016
©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be heard rather than read.
Please join us for worship at 10:30 a.m. on Sundays

WHAT?
What in the world are we doing here? Why do you sit politely in those pews, as people direct you on when to sit, stand, and speak? Why do you literally let this institution put words in your mouth? What good is it doing any of us to participate in this ritual of Sunday Christian worship?

I ask myself those questions all of the time. All of the time I wonder how this—greetings, announcements, passing the peace, call to worship, hymn, prayers of confession and assurance, children’s celebration, scripture, sermon, hymn, Communion, prayers of the people, mission moment, offering, more prayers, another hymn, and benediction—how all of this came to be the primary corporate response to the stories of Moses and Hannah and Jesus and the Marys.

There is nothing in the Bible about pipe organs or stained glass, when to stand or when to shake hands. Yes, there is plenty of instruction about how to worship in a temple in Jerusalem that will never be built again. And the psalms give us more general instruction about joy and harps and horns and song.

But Jesus? Jesus told us to tear down institutions that exist only for their own sake, to pray privately, and to give away all that we have in order to be in utter service to God through service for others.
Continue reading