God’s Power: Luke 24.1–12

2017.4.16 lifeDelivered at Ames UCC
on April 16, 2017

©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

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GOD’S POWER
What is the power of God?

In our scripture last week, and throughout his public ministry, Jesus rejected the understanding of God’s power that he saw most people practicing.

He goes into the temple: Stop selling doves, stop killing, he screams. God does not want your sacrifices. Did we not learn from our many, long years in the wilderness with Moses that using intermediaries between us and God just drives us further east of Eden, not closer to it? Did God not bring Abraham back from the brink of infanticide with the hopes of, once and for all, getting us to hear that sacrifices are never pleasing?

God is not greedy for gifts! Holiness is not an exchange commodity.

But then Jesus dies. He dies as so many men and women have died: at the hands of a state that just needs someone to point a finger at in order to justify their show of force. It is the state that loves a sacrifice. It is the state—which is just a group of humans—that lusts for gifts, especially those that will devastate other humans into submission. Humans, not God, want a sacrifice.

ORTHODOXY AND ACCESS
I know that is contrary to the most recent thousand years of Christian orthodoxy. But in the first thousand years, the notion that God needed Jesus to die as a sacrifice was not so prevalent as it is now. There is no evidence, in a Christian church before the tenth century, of Jesus on a cross.

What mattered in the earliest days—and what continued to get followers of Jesus in trouble with the state—were the practices of feeding and tending to each other without regard for social hierarchies. Just as in the time before his death, in the decades immediately after, the good news continued to be about egalitarianism and God’s love for everybody and every body, not just priests or kings who claimed special access.

Everything in Jesus’ life was about total access: Children, you have access; women, you have access; the sick and disabled, you have access; foreigners, you have access. Access to God is in the radical generosity of feeding and the radical relationality of healing.

But then what do we do with Holy Week? If Jesus had such great access to God through his walking, talking, eating, feeding, resting, and resisting but still died, what is the power of God? Couldn’t the later theologians have simply heard God still speaking, as we profess happens, and figured out that, while God may not have wanted the sacrifices of birds and cows, God somehow wanted one of Jesus?
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Bearers of Easter Hope: Mark 13.1–8, 24–37

GoodFridaycrossDelivered at Ames UCC
on March 13, 2016
©The Rev. Eileen Gebbie

Sermons are written to be
heard rather than read.

Please join us for worship
at 10:45 a.m. on Sundays.

THE END IS NEAR
This temple will crumble. False prophets will betray you. War is inevitable. The Earth will shake and people will starve. These are the signs predicted by Isaiah (13.10, 34.4), Ezekiel (32.7–8),
and Joel (2.10, 31; 3.15).

You will see them very soon. So stay awake! Do not disappoint your God! Be ready!

As Jesus prepares to end his life, he predicts the end of everyone else’s, too.

Why? Because he was the anointed one and knew something others did not? Possibly. But also because Jesus, at least in Mark, was an apocalyptic leader by nature.

And because it had happened before.

APOCALYPSE
Apocalypse comes from the Greek apokalyptein, which means to uncover or reveal. Within an apocalyptic mindset, there is truth to be uncovered or revealed through a being not of this world.  Apocalypse assumes that there can no redemption for humanity without a radical intervention. And, in fact, that intervention is coming. The outcome will be judgment and destruction of the wicked, followed by resurrection, and afterlife.
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Let’s Go to the Governor’s Office!

The week before Thanksgiving, Faith in Public Life put out a petition regarding the statement by many governors that they would not welcome Syrian refugees. This was a knee-jerk response to the bombing in Paris. I signed the petition and responded affirmatively to a request for clergy to participate in an action at the office of Terry Branstad, who was one of those governors, on Monday, November 23.

That afternoon a couple of dozen of us, overwhelmingly from the Iowa Conference of the United Church of Christ, read statements disrupting the false, bigoted assumptions about fellow humans fleeing a war zone, and Iowa’s moral obligation to refugees. We then delivered the petition and its over 2,000 signatures.

My statement is here, as well as a video of the event.

My name is Eileen Gebbie. I am the Senior Minister at Ames United Church of Christ. As the child of an immigrant, the niece of an immigrant, and an ordained Christian minister, I urge the elected leaders of our nation to be the moral authority right here at home that America strives to be throughout the world. From escaped slaves to LGBTQ people, the state of Iowa itself has a long and proud history of standing on the side of the oppressed, those who have been dehumanized and feared. We have demonstrated that it is not only our responsibility, but our honor, to welcome and care for the widow, the orphan, and the stranger. Let the current Syrian refugee crisis not be an exception. Thank you.